What about supplements?

What about Supplements?

Balancing a nickel food allergy and adequate nutrition can be challenging on the low nickel diet. Many people have asked me whether or not I take supplements. Personally I have from time to time used supplements, but I don’t regularly like relying on them. 

Previously I’ve taken fish oil, vitamin D, C, E supplements and a super vitamin B complex when I can tell my diet lacks specific natural vitamins. Now, I only take the super B-complex + C multi-vitamin a couple times a week.

Personally I’ve tried taking chewable 500 mg of vitamin C tablets with a meal and though I enjoy the way they taste, the supplement hasn’t helped as much with the absorption of nickel.

I’m very reluctant to take iron supplements as our bodies can store excess iron and the only way I know how to eliminate it from your body is by regularly donating blood. In addition, hemochromatosis, an iron disorder where “the body loads too much iron” is a genetic condition that runs in my family. 

My hesitancy to regularly take supplements is based in the fact that in the U.S. where I live supplements aren’t regulated like pharmaceuticals. Many of the ingredients in supplements include terrible fillers that can actually make things worse by including things high in nickel. Some of these fillers, like soy, can be listed on the label; while others are not.

Readers have asked me about quercetin, bromelain, or psyllium. I don’t know what to say, as I’ve never tried them. Yet, it’s always recommended you reach out to a medical professional or physician regarding your personal situation, supplements and their relationship to allergies.

Choosing to reduce my nickel absorption naturally, I have experienced success when I include foods high in vitamin C, like oranges, berries, bell peppers, and iron, such as beef or my 50% iron fortified Rice Chex cereal in my diet. 

If you have found a certain supplement that work well for you, I’d love to hear about it in the comments below.